Ferris Plock- Tiger Waiting, 2010

Ferris Plock- Tiger Waiting, 2010


picturesofwar:

An Irishman looking through a bullet-riddled window pane during the Irish Civil War.  Dublin, 1922.
Photo by Walter Doughty.

picturesofwar:

An Irishman looking through a bullet-riddled window pane during the Irish Civil War.  Dublin, 1922.

Photo by Walter Doughty.

(via picturesofwar-deactivated201307)


A little early Friday afternoon cheer. 

A little early Friday afternoon cheer. 


hifructosemag:

We featured street artist JR in Hi-Fructose vol.21, here’s a favorite past project of his. More info here: http://hifructose.com/the-blog/916-jrs-unframed.html


smithsonianmag:

Stop-motion at its best. “Fresh Guacamole”

Animator Adam Pesapane turns everyday objects into guacamole in this flawless stop-motion video.

Ed note: Check out our Food & Think blog for fascinating culinary info.


h/t PetaPixel

(via smithsonianmag)


cartophile:

Colonial Powers in Africa Circa 1908 
Afrikaans: the official language of South America since the 17th century.

cartophile:

Colonial Powers in Africa Circa 1908 

Afrikaans: the official language of South America since the 17th century.


smithsonianmag:

The iPad of 1935

The April, 1935 issue of Everyday Science and Mechanics included this nift invention which was to be the next logical step in the world of publishing. Basically a microfilm reader mounted on a large pole, the media device was supposed to let you sit back in your favorite chair while reading your latest tome of choice.

Continue reading at Smithsonian.com.
Illustration courtesy of Paleofuture

smithsonianmag:

The iPad of 1935

The April, 1935 issue of Everyday Science and Mechanics included this nift invention which was to be the next logical step in the world of publishing. Basically a microfilm reader mounted on a large pole, the media device was supposed to let you sit back in your favorite chair while reading your latest tome of choice.

Continue reading at Smithsonian.com.

Illustration courtesy of Paleofuture

(via smithsonianmag)


preservearchives:

Conservation of the telephone patent

This week is the anniversary of the patent for the telephone invented by Alexander Graham Bell. On March 7, 1876, the US Patent Office approved patent 174,465 for the first apparatus capable of transmitting the human voice through sound vibration. One hundred and thirty plus years later, it’s not difficult to wonder what Bell would think of all the modes of communication that evolved from his design.

Recently, the patent drawings for the telephone came to the conservation lab.  Conservation treatment included surface cleaning to remove dirt and grime, then  overall flattening to eliminate planar distortions. Tears and losses along the edges were mended and filled with Japanese paper toned with acrylic paint. The patent drawings had been damaged by heavy use and handling. Treatment stabilized the drawings and removed old repairs. But they retain the evidence of handling and poor quality adhesives and old agency markings.  

Pictured above are before and after shots of sheets one and two of the patent. ARC identifier 302052


Look ma, no hands

Look ma, no hands

(via rickkanelives)


Wood Sculptures by Bruno Walpoth

If this isn’t inspiring or even slightly demoralizing, I don’t know what is.

(via hifructosemag)